Open Text acquires Vignette

After Autonomy/Interwoven and Oracle/Sun news, here comes the third big news of the year.

If Unilever can have multiple soaps and GM can have multiple car models, why can’t a Content Management vendor have multiple products? OT’s acquisition of Vignette points to this increasing “commoditization” of Content Management marketplace.

There may be a lot of overlaps in products across OT and Vignette but we all know that one size does not fit all and so why not have different products for different scenarios, different price points, different technology stacks and different requirements?  OT now has multiple options for Document Management, DAM, WCM etc plus a bonus portal server that they lacked before. They had a portal integration kit (PIK) that exposed LiveLink’s functionality as portlets that could be deployed on some of the portal servers (but not VAP and Sun as far as I know).

There’s some good analysis here and here.

On a side note, I think people who worked closely with Vignette knew it coming. A colleague of mine told me this:

One Singapore based vignette customer we were talking to  suddenly went quiet and our sales guy spotted him meeting OpenText. Another one who we were talking to, suddenly decided not to continue with Vignette and decided to migrate to Day communiqué. A senior person in Vignette Singapore joined OpenText about 2-3 months back – and was not replaced. There were many other signs in the way Vignette was handling people and partnerships that showed something is on.

I always considered Interwoven, Vignette and Fatwire (Open Market, Divine and FutureTense before that) as the leaders and pioneers in pure play Web Content space. With Interwoven and Vignette gone, what does this mean for the WCM marketplace? An end of the era?

Oracle buys Sun

Oracle announced it will acquire Sun.

Another big Portal/Content Management vendor is now an infrastructure vendor. Sometimes I wonder if  everything will soon become an appliance – you buy a Solaris box and it will come bundled not only with the OS (obviously) but also with WebCenter (or one of the numerous Oracle Portal type products), Content Server and so on. IBM, EMC and Microsoft can do this already in some sense.

Sun had open sourced its entire JES or Java ES (Java Enterprise System) sometime back and more recently dropped the JES Portal Server in favor of a partnership with Liferay. The result was WebSynergy, Sun’s branded portal based on Liferay’s codebase. It is not clear how Oracle will continue this partnership and frankly  they already have too many portal kind of offerings to continue with this. However, I think Liferay has a strong offering (and recently opened a new office in India) and will continue to be a good open source alternative whether or not Oracle continues this partnership.

The other component of JES that might have some relevant features is probably Sun Java Communications Suite which has features for collaboration  – things like calendar, messaging, Instant messenger as well as support for mobile communications. Some of these could be good additions to Oracle’s Fusion.

On a different note though, Janus had this to say on twitter:

Oracle buys sun – now Oracle has 5 enterprise portals! a new commercial for Larry: 5 out of 12 most significant portals are powered by ORCL

In spite of that, they had to resort to static pages!?

Autonomy Acquires Interwoven

It was a usual hectic day at work when I read about this sudden interesting development of Interwoven to be acquired by Autonomy. You can read more about it at CMS Watch and CMS Wire.

I felt a bit sad – Interwoven was one of the few pure play CMS vendors and pioneered many of the Content Management concepts. Okay, so the products will still be there but you never know how they evolve in the context of a new setup. A lot of attention  is now on Vignette, the other major CMS vendor. I wonder, why is no one talking of Fatwire?

Lee Dallas calls this a consolidation in a different direction. Most others in this space have been with infrastructure vendors or with other related vendor. So in that sense, this brings in a unique differentiation for both these vendors. What could be interesting in this context is what now happens to Autonomy’s relationships with other CMS vendors. Many CMS vendors had integrations and OEM relationships with Autonomy and those will probably get redefined now. Similarly, Interwoven’s partnership with other search vendors (like FAST) will probably also get reviewed.

Even though Autonomy is known more for its search products, it also has offerings for BPM (Cardiff), Records Management (Meridio) and Digital Assets (Virage). So it would be interesting to see how and when overlaps are rationalized with Interwoven’s MediaBin, WorkSite and other related offerings.

In other interesting news this week, Alfresco released the final version of Alfresco 3 Labs, which among other things has Web Studio, a designer tool to build web application. But that is a topic of another post.